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Prof Monica Slavin (NCIC director), Mr Frank McGuire (Parliamentary Secretary for Medical research) and Ms Dale Fisher (CEO Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre) open the National Centre for Infections in Cancer, 2017.

Prof Monica Slavin (NCIC director), Mr Frank McGuire (Parliamentary Secretary for Medical research) and Ms Dale Fisher (CEO Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre) open the National Centre for Infections in Cancer, 2017.

Inaugural NCIC Symposium and Launch

Infection is a major cause of death and hospitalisation for cancer patients globally. Infections also adversely impact on cancer treatment and quality of life and are associated with significant cost to the health care system. Due to increasing intensity and complexity of cancer therapies many cancer patients are exposed to both common and unusual infections on a background of increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. Currently there are limitations in the provision of optimal treatment to reduce morbidity, mortality and the substantive economic costs of infection in these patients. Specialised approaches to prevent and respond effectively to infection in cancer patients are urgently required.

Prof Monica Slavin of the National Centre for Infections in Cancer (NCIC) and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre is leading the way with a new NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence, which was launched last Friday at the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre in Melbourne by Mr Frank McGuire Parliamentary Secretary for Medical Research and Ms Dale Fisher, CEO Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre.

In her keynote presentation Professor Slavin outlined the NCIC strategy of Surveillance, Implementation and Innovation which are at the core of educating clinicians, allied health professionals and patients across Australia on the special issues associated with reducing infections in and improving the lives of cancer patients.


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Call for global action on life-threatening fungal infections

University of Manchester researchers have co-ordinated a ‘first of its kind’ series, published today in the prestigious journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Most deaths from fungal diseases are avoidable. Most serious fungal infections are ‘hidden’, occurring as a consequence of other health problems such as asthma, AIDS, cancer, organ transplant and corticosteroid therapies.

Profesor Juan Luis Rodriguez Tudela said:  “Improvements in patient outcomes require changes in all part of the health care ‘ecosystem’, notably clinical training, access to and resource for fungal diagnostics, access to affordable antifungal therapy. A major public health response is called for.”


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